What we're reading

Photo by Bart Heird
Sep 2013
9

This is the first of a regular round-up of things we've enjoyed reading.

From the media

"Mapping the Anthropocene: Visualizing How Humans are Embedded in Nature"

Erle Ellis, Navin Ramankutty, Chad Monfreda – The Breakthrough

"We need to repurpose science".

Melanie Smallman in the Guardian on a science fit for the challenges of the 21st century

"We really don't know how global warming will affect the number of hurricanes and their intensity"

Jeff Masters responds in his blog to new modelling results from Kerry Emanuel of MIT

"The IPCC is still a curiously misunderstood body"

Pilita Clark tries to help – Financial Times

"Advocacy by climate scientists has damaged trust in the science"

Tamsin Edwards says scientists must be impartial – The Guardian

"Egypt is on the brink of a protracted state-collapse process driven by intensifying resource scarcity"

The Atlantic on the roots of Egypt's crisis in energy, food and water shortfalls.

"The dubious history of weather manipulation"

Foreign Policy offers a chronology of  efforts that prefigure geoengineering (possibly).

"Intensified systems do not meet global food needs"

Brian Wynne and Georgina Catacora-Vargas call for a rethink on scientific approaches to agricultural innovation – SciDev.Net

 "I didn’t think things would look so good right now"

Charles Kenny of the Center for Global Development asseses the state of debate on post-2015 development goals – SciDev.Net

"Ecologists should pay much more attention to the links between natural resources and human actors"

The Stockholm Resilience Centre offers a new analysis of regime shifts in ecosystems.

"Climate change is a leveler"

Interview with Rachel Kyte of the World Bank on why overcoming poverty entails taking on global warming. – The National Journal

"Lovelock's grand vision marches on"

New Scientist reviews Michael Ruse's new history of the Gaia hypothesis.

"Join us in a global conversation"

The Rockefeller Foundation launches its Centennial Challenge - for Resilient Cities.

From peer-reviewed journals

Globally networked risks and how to respond

Dirk Helbing in Nature: Is it possible to manage global systemic risk?

Overestimated global warming over the past 20 years

John C. Fyfe, Nathan P. Gillett and Francis W. Zwiers write in Nature Climate Change: why the models got it wrong.

Palaeoclimate: East Antarctica's Achilles' heel

Claus-Dieter Hillenbrand in Nature: Parts of the world’s most stable ice sheet may not be so stable.

Half of All Papers Now Free in Some Form, Study Claims

Jocelyn Kaiser in Science: Too good to be true?

Planetary boundaries, equity and global sustainability: why wealthy countries could benefit from more equity

Will Steffen, Mark Stafford Smith in Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability: When it comes to sustainability (and much else) equality is in the best interests of the wealthy nations.

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