Videos: Live from the 2017 Lund Conference on Earth System Governance

Lund University in Sweden. Photo: Jan Stefka via Flickr
Watch videos recorded live during this conference in October 2017, which examined issues around how humans govern their interactions with the planet.

This week marked the 2017 Lund Conference on Earth System Governance – an event that brought together researchers, representatives from civil society and activists to delve into “Allocation and Access in a Warming and Increasingly Unequal World.” The conference, which ran from 9 to 11 October in Lund, Sweden, was an annual meeting of Earth System Governance, a global research project of Future Earth.

Future Earth’s Alistair Scrutton was on-hand at the conference to record live video of panels and more. Watch below to see interviews with Vasna Ramasar, chair of the conference, and Dhanasree Jayaram, a doctoral candidate attending the conference with travel support from Future Earth. You can also check a discussion on the role of science in activism and a debate on ecological democracy.

To learn more about the conference, visit the event website. Or read our recent blog post here.

In this interview, conference chair Vasna Ramasar talks about the goals of the three-day event and the evolving role of science in activism.

In this interview, Dhanasree Jayaram, a doctoral candidate at Manipal University in Karnataka, India, discusses the different perspectives that came together at the conference in Lund.

Follow along with an event on 11 October called "From Science to Action: What role do scientists play in activism?" This discussion was chaired by Emily Boyd from Lund University and featured speakers Dana Fisher from the University of Maryland and Patrick Bond from the Wits School of Governance.

See a full session on "Conceptual understandings and progress - ecological democracy." This event, which ran on 11 October, included talks from John Dryzek and Jonathan Pickering from the University of Canberra, Carole-Anne Sénit from Utrecht University and Åsa Persson from the Stockholm Environment Institute.